Time and energy needed to get to the real truth has never been directed more incompetently than last week in here. If you need someone to prove to you that something is fake, which you yourself don’t have any evidence that it’s real, your logic and whole system of beliefs is probably wrong.

Generate New Template

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Sorry to be a hater, but it’s another embarrassing day for this community (at least for those who take things here seriously).

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2352250X22001282

Intro from article: The advent of social media had a profound impact on how people access information and interact online. Users tend to acquire information they like, filter out information they do not, and join groups of like-minded peers around a shared narrative called echo chambers [1, 2, 3∗∗]. According to group polarisation theory, an echo chamber can act as a mechanism to reinforce existing opinions moving the entire group toward more extreme positions. In many instances, conspiracy theories are the pivot around which echo chambers develop and grow [4,3,5]. Considering that the spreading of conspiracy theories can have potentially harmful consequences for individuals and societies [6,7], understanding the proliferation of such theories in online environments, especially in the context of an infodemic [8,9], becomes of fundamental importance.

A relevant aspect concerning the spreading of conspiracy theories online is empirical evidence for the fact that individuals endorsing conspiracy content (e.g. on Facebook) were highly engaged and more responsive to endorse deliberately false or other questionable information [1]. Indeed, in the context of internet and social media, conspiracy theories seems to be strongly related to misinformation, with which they share many aspects ranging from the presence of questionable elements in their narrative to the reasons why they appeal to potential believers [10]. Also, the way in which conspiracy theories propagate in online communities seem to present structural features that are remarkably similar [11] to those of (mis)information cascades happening on Facebook [2] and Twitter [12]. However, results concerning structural differences in information cascades should be taken with caution [13] given the intrinsic limitation of a false/true or science/conspiracy dichotomy and the inherent unbalance of these categorised datasets [14].

Like misinformation, conspiracy theories appear on most social media platforms, from mainstream to niche ones, involving all kind of users, from genuine believers to debunkers and simple observers [15]. While non-conspiracy information by news outlets outpaces conspiracy-related content, the relevance of the users’ engagement around conspiracy is not negligible [2,12].

submitted by /u/MrZakius
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